Sclerotherapy for Varicose and Spider Veins

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´╗┐Sclerotherapy for Varicose and Spider Veins

Sclerotherapy for Varicose and Spider Veins


In this article

What Happens After Sclerotherapy


After sclerotherapy you will be able to drive yourself home and resume your regular daily activities. Walking is encouraged.

You will be instructed to wear support hosiery to "compress" the treated vessels. If you have compression hosiery from previous treatments, you are encouraged to bring them with you to be certain they still have adequate compression. Department store support stockings will not be adequate if a heavy compression stocking is needed. Your doctor's office can recommend where to purchase heavy compression stockings.

Following the injections, avoid aspirin, ibuprofen, or other anti-inflammatory drugs for at least 48 hours. Tylenol may be used if needed.

Also, you should avoid the following for 48 hours after treatment:
  • Hot baths
  • Hot compresses
  • Whirlpools or saunas
  • Direct exposure to sunlight

Showers are permitted, but the water should be cooler than usual. The injection sites may be washed with a mild soap and tepid water.

Sclerotherapy Effectiveness


Studies have shown that as many as 50%-80% of injected veins may be eliminated with each session of sclerotherapy. Less than 10% of the people who have sclerotherapy do not respond to the injections at all. In these instances, different solutions can be tried. Although this procedure works for most patients, there are no guarantees for success.

In general, spider veins respond in three to six weeks, and larger veins respond in three to four months. If the veins respond to the treatment, they will not reappear. However, new veins may appear at the same rate as before. If needed, you may return for injections.

Insurance Coverage for Sclerotherapy


Insurance coverage for sclerotherapy varies. If your varicose veins are causing medical problems such as pain or chronic swelling, your insurance may offer reimbursement. If you are pursuing sclerotherapy for cosmetic purposes only, your insurance carrier most likely will not provide coverage. You should discuss your concerns with your doctor. If you have questions, call your insurance company, which may request a letter from your doctor concerning the nature of your treatment and medical necessity.

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